Now Oprah viewers can meet a witch, practice a ritual circle

Essy, a mystical witch, teaches viewers how to conjure up the Spirit of Air in a ritual circle

Let me start by saying that Christians LOVE the sticky mess that Soul Pancake and Oprah are. The biggest Emergent leadership conference, Catalyst, hosted Soul Pancake creator Rainn Wilson recently so that young upcoming leaders could incorporate this mind-boggling spirituality into their Christian teachings. And we reported last year that Oprah Winfrey's anything-goes "Soul Pancake" spirituality channel is now promoting "Past Life Regression" therapy. This is nothing more than the Buddhist teachings of reincarnation. Yet Christians in her audience see no problem with this. And don't even get us started on Oprah's new tour with apostate heretic Rob Bell.

But witchcraft?

We know that Oprah Winfrey doesn't believe that Jesus Christ is the only way. She has been clear about her universalist, mystical occult leanings for years, so Christians should not be surprised about this. But what jumped out at me this morning was the normalization of witchcraft.  Oprah's OWN channel provides millions of fans around the world with shows such as Soul Pancake and others that lure folks into a false spirituality that's promoted as all good. Here we have a Soul Pancake "Have a Little Faith" episode airing this past weekend with host Zach Anner having his first ever encounter with a witch. He meets with Essy, an earth-based mystic witch, learns about her spiritual practice and participates in a ritual circle. Here, Zach and friends conjure up the Spirit of Air by making bird sounds:

"We're a HUGE pantheon of all different kinds of people," explains Essy. "When I was really young I felt a sort of freakish connection with nature."  Yes, and the Bible is very clear about witchraft and sorcery. Scroll over these verses to see for yourself:  Leviticus 20:6, Leviticus 19:31, Galatians 5:20-21, Acts 19:19, you get the idea. There are many more here.

Soul Pancake is created by Oprah's friend, actor Rainn Wilson (Dwight Schrute of "The Office"), who describes SoulPancake as: "a creative way to chew on life's big questions and figure out what it means to be human." This journey led him to the Baha'i faith, which he described to Oprah in their first Soul Series in 2009: